Number of Female IC Residents in US on the Rise

The Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) releases an annual data report which includes the number of residents in each medical speciality broken down by gender. The (publicly available) reports go back to 2007-2008 when the number of female ICs was a meager 6%, but women are on the rise in interventional cardiology, and the 2011-2012 ACGME report shows that they now represent a more healthy 10% of IC residents in the US. Could this increase be due to groups like SCAI Women in Innovations working to make women more visible in the field, and addressing the gender-specific challenges women face as interventional cardiologists? Maybe. While we’ll never know for sure, and there are certainly other factors at play, we’re excited to see the trend.

 

 

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Bridging the Pay Gap – What Can Women Do?

MedPage Today just published an article suggesting ways that female physicians might bridge the pay gap between themselves and their male counterparts. As more women enter the medical workforce, competing for promotions and leadership positions, the pay gap is receiving more attention;

    – Women physicians earn $0.62 on the dollar as compared to men (US Census Bureau, 2010).

- Women physicians start out their careers with a $17,000 pay gap, after all other factors are accounted for (LoSasso, Health Affairs 2011).

- Mid-career women physician researchers are paid $12,000 less than their male counterparts (Jagsi, JAMA 2012).

Some of the article’s suggestions for how to bridge the gap are silly. Move to the Mid West? Really? That seems like a reasonable solution for a woman whose spouse likely works full time and whose kids are settled in school. Great suggestion. Next!

Not all of the advice is off the mark, however. Key amonst the suggestions is a) know your market value – based on your experience, specialty area and geographic location and b) negotiate your way to what you want. Too often people become incensed about some great injustice the perpetrator has no knowledge they are committing. So stay cool, be reasonable, but get in there and be your own advocate. Know the players. Play the game. It’s not about compromising yourself. It’s about actively particpiating in your path to success.

7 Tips for Masterful Negotiating (Inc. Magazine)

SCAI Women in Innovations (“WIN”) will cover this topic, and others, at the Women in Interventional Cardiology lunch symposium scheduled for Friday, March 10th in Orlando, FL during the SCAI Annual Scientific Sessions. To learn more about the program, click HERE.

 

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WIN Members Help to Organize Heart Health Campaign in Argentina

WIN member Florencia Rolandi, MD, has helped to launch a public awareness campaign around women and heart disease in Argentina. The campaign, titled “A Woman’s Heart Can be Broken: SERIOUSLY” has drawn the partnership of major celebrities and includes TV spots, print advertisements (see left) and a Facebook page. The campaign continues to roll out, and WIN looks forward to sharing the success of this amazing effort with you!

 

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Latina Women Develop Heart Disease Earlier

Interventional cardiologist Guilherme Silva, MD discusses heart disease in the Latino community with Fox 26′s “Hola Houston,” covering why Latino women are more likely to develop heart disease earlier than other women, and what they can do about it.

 

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Who Are the Women of WIN?

In an effort to promote communication and visibility amongst the membership, WIN is now featuring member profiles on its website. The hope is to tell the story of the WIN members, one by one, around the world, in order to connect you to each other, showcase your accomplishments and promote awareness of female interventional cardiologists. We hope you’ll take the opportunity to browse through the profiles, which we will continue to post on an ongoing basis, and to connect with each other if you see a shared area of interest. If you’d like to be featured in the profile section, please contact WIN Director, Rebecca Ortega via rortega@scai.org.

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