Radial Approach Underutilized in Women?

 

In a retrospective study published in Circulation using data from the CathPCI registry on more than 2.8 million procedures between January 2007 and September 2012, researchers found that radial access PCI increased 13-fold, from a negligible 1.2% at the beginning of the study to 16.1% at the end. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to evaluate the adjusted association between r-PCI and bleeding, vascular complications, and procedural success, using transfemoral PCI as the reference. After multivariable adjustment, r-PCI use in the studied cohort of patients was associated with lower risk of bleeding (adjusted odds ratio, 0.51; 95% confidence interval, 0.49–0.54) and lower risk of vascular complications (adjusted odds ratio, 0.39; 95% confidence interval, 0.31–0.50) in comparison with transfemoral PCI. The reduction in bleeding and vascular complications was consistent across important subgroups of age, sex, and clinical presentation. Despite this, radial access is used less often in certain high-risk groups, including elderly patients 75 years of age or greater, women, and patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). The authors note, these high-risk groups may derive the greatest benefit from radial access in terms of absolute risk reduction in bleeding and vascular complications.

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One Response to Radial Approach Underutilized in Women?

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